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Low Sodium Coleslaw With Yogurt Dressing

Here is a homemade low sodium coleslaw recipe version that replaces the mayonnaise with yogurt.  With a dairy free soy yogurt no less. I was skeptical that I would like the “slaw” dressing without the typical mayonnaise.  But it has a really refreshing taste and makes the most delicious creamy dressing. This low sodium coleslaw recipe is a quick, easy and sure to become a favorite side dish. Give it a shot, I recommend it.

LOW SODIUM COLESLAW WITH YOGURT DRESSING

Sodium Total  340 mg   –   Sodium / Serving  34 mg   –   Calories / Serving  57

nutrition label of store bought coleslaw

This coleslaw recipe is loaded with fresh, colorful flavors that will add a cooling pizazz to anything you serve it with. Try this as a topping to sandwiches, chili’s, barbecued beef or pulled pork. Or heap some on top of a hamburger. Almost said hotdogs… but sadly can’t have those anymore. At 57 mg of sodium this recipe easily blows away the 375 mg of sodium per cup, of store bought coleslaw. Sugar is also significantly reduced, with no loss in taste in my opinion.

low sodium coleslaw with creamy yogurt dressing
Serving bowl of low sodium coleslaw with creamy yogurt dressing

WHAT CABBAGE TO USE FOR COLESLAW?

Interestingly, the majority of the sodium present comes from the cabbage and carrots themselves.

low sodium coleslaw ingredients
Ingredients for homemade LoSo coleslaw

I use a half and half combination of red and green cabbage when I make coleslaw. It makes the dish have a really colorful appeal. You can use just one variety though, any taste difference would be slight and it is covered in dressing,  If you use both red and green look for a head that is about 5-6 inches around.  When I bought mine for this recipe the store only had large.  So I ended up using only half of each head for this recipe. And then had to look up new recipes to use the rest!

You could substitute the cabbage and carrot called for in the recipe with a store-bought bag. Sometimes labeled as tri-color, I do believe a 16 oz. package will fit the requirements for the recipe.  You’re looking for 8-9 cups, and a cup of shredded cabbage averages 85 grams or 3 ounces. You’ll need to double check though as I’ve only ever used fresh cut cabbage.

CUTTING THE CABBAGE FOR COLESLAW

Here’s how to cut and shred the cabbage with ease-

  1. Remove one layer of the outer leaves.
  2. Cut the cabbage into quarters, and then cut the core bottom stub off.
  3. Cut the rest of the core out by slicing down at an angle. (shown in photo)
  4. Then cut that quarter into thirds and slice into shreds of desired thickness.  I try for about a 1/8” thick.
  5. You could also use your food processor with a shredding attachment.
  • low sodium coleslaw quartered cabbage
    Cut stem bottom off quartered cabbage
  • low sodium coleslaw removing core
    Quartering cabbage allows core to be cut out at an angle
  • low sodium coleslaw cut quarter into thirds
    Cut quartered cabbage into thirds for chopping
  • low sodium coleslaw chopping cabbage
    Chopping and shredding red cabbage

A CREAMY YOGURT LOSO COLESLAW DRESSING

This low sodium coleslaw dressing alternative is quick to make and uses simple ingredients. It’s creamy, flavorful, and fresh. I came across this soy yogurt in a search for mayonnaise alternatives and gave it a try. I’m happy I gave it a chance. Soy yogurt plain is the base and makes a creamy dressing alternative to mayonnaise.  It really is good, go ahead and give it a try as it only adds 9mg sodium per serving.  If your heart is set on the classic mayonnaise coleslaw though, use my homemade low sodium mayonnaise (at 7 mg per serving) that is quite good also.

low sodium coleslaw mixing yogurt dressing
Combining the yogurt coleslaw dressing

DRESSING INGREDIENTS

Apple cider vinegar adds a fresh zing to the dressing. You can substitute other kinds of vinegar like rice vinegar, red wine vinegar or even balsamic vinegar.

Dry mustard provides and little background mustard taste without adding the sodium of a processed mustard. 

Sweet paprika infuses a little for a delayed zing.  Add this bit by bit to your desired level.

Parsley leaves I used the dried flakes.  Most recipes call for fresh and chopped. For me the prep time and storage isn’t worth any difference in taste.  But by all means use fresh if you desire.

Celery seeds are essential. They add taste just like celery and really add that “something” to the dressing that would be missing without them. Give them a quick pounding between two hard surfaces to release some extra flavor.  Celery flakes could also be used.

You may wonder about adding sugar? I don’t add any sugar even though some coleslaw recipes call for it. I feel it is just an unnecessary increase in our daily sugar in this case. For me the taste of the cabbage, carrots and either yogurt or mayonnaise dressing is sweet enough. If you desire, add a teaspoon of sugar at a time to your taste. Add this while preparing the dressing before combining with the cabbage and carrot.

low sodium coleslaw look at the colors
Colorful bowl of low sodium coleslaw

ADDING THE DRESSING

When you’re ready to mix with the cabbage start with about two-thirds, give everything a toss and then see just how much more dressing you feel your coleslaw may need. I had about 8-9 cups cabbage and I ended up using the whole amount of dressing as called for. Coleslaw should not be drenched in dressing. So make sure to add it slowly to your taste in a nice even coating.

If you have extra leftover yogurt coleslaw dressing don’t discard it! It can keep in the fridge (lasting for days, or a couple weeks). Use it for sandwiches or for a sauce on roasted or grilled vegetables.

The longer the coleslaw is covered in the dressing, the softer and less crunchy it will become.

low sodium coleslaw nothing but yum
Creamy, colorful coleslaw is nothing but yum
low sodium coleslaw look at the colors

Low Sodium – Low Sugar Coleslaw

Check out this low sodium coleslaw with a creamy cool, colorful and crunchy bite. It is almost a required recipe for the summer cookout season. It’s the perfect side to have with burgers, BBQ or chicken.
0 from 0 votes
Prep Time 30 mins
Total Time 30 mins
Course Side Dish
Cuisine American
Servings 10 cups
Calories 57 kcal

Ingredients
  

  • 1 medium cabbage red and/or green about 6″ diameter 8-9 cups req’d
  • 3 medium carrots
  • 1/2 cup parsley leaves
  • 1 cup soy yogurt plain
  • 2 tbsp apple cider vinegar
  • 2 tbsp dry ground mustard
  • ½ tsp sweet paprika adjust as desired
  • 1 tsp celery seeds
  • 1 tsp ground black pepper

Instructions
 

  • Cut and quarter the cabbage through the core, and then cut out the core. Cut each quarter crosswise in half and finely shred. Place the shredded cabbage in a large bowl (you should have 8 to 9 cups).
  • Peel and shred carrots
  • Add the shredded carrot and to the cabbage and toss to mix.
  • In a separate bowl, stir the soy yogurt, parsley, vinegar, mustard, paprika, celery seeds, and pepper together. Always taste and then adjust if desired.
  • Pour two-thirds of the dressing over the cabbage and carrot then mix well.
  • If the coleslaw seems dry, add a little more of the dressing.
  • Eat right away or let it sit in the refrigerator for about an hour to let the flavors mingle.

Notes

  1. Do not add all the dressing at once. Then add more depending on the “fluff” of the shred and how doused in dressing you want it.
  2. Save any leftover dressing for individuals to add more on or for other use such as sauces and dips.

Nutrition

Calories: 57kcal
Did you make this recipe?Leave a rating and let me know how it was!
low sodium coleslaw with pulled pork
Creamy coleslaw with pulled pork sandwich

As always, please let me know how you like this recipe in the comments! I get motivated to hear from you and am interested on how you serve your Low Sodium Coleslaw with a twist. And please share any tips you might have.

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